The Worlds Of Michael J Parry

The Public Art of Publishing A Conversation


So in the last few days I have had some conversations about the reuse of tweets, whether it is ethical to quote them, have you published when tweeting and generally around the whole concept of privacy and ethics.  I have had a few thoughts which I am going to share. Feel free to leap in and let me know where you think I have got it wrong.  O, and I am putting this on my writers’ blog The Worlds of Michael J Parry and my library blog The Room of Infinite Diligence because of many intersections.

The first question I considered is: “Is tweeting publishing”. The OED first defines publishing as “To make public”, or in fuller “To make public or generally known; to declare or report openly or publicly; to announce; (also) to propagate or disseminate (a creed or system). In later use sometimes passing into sense.” Which makes sense to me although from that you could say the act of speaking is publishing.

To me the act of publishing is when you take a thought, which up until that moment is privately held within your mind, and you then express it in some way that makes the thought more permanent and transmittable to others by some form of media.

By this definition, and by my way of thinking, then yes Tweeting is a form of publication.

So then the questions become even more complex. What rights do you as the originator of the tweet have other how the tweet is used? What responsibilities do the reader and potential re-user of the tweet have to you as the content creator?

For me it comes down, as it often does, to context. Do you have an expectation of privacy around your tweet? If you are tweeting from a locked account yes. You control who can see and read it. If you have a public account I don’t see how you can. A public account is by its nature, public.

To my mind, if you publicly tweet something, you are publishing it and giving it to the world for free to read and then potentially reuse. We implicitly agree to this through using the service and through our acceptance of such functionality as the ability to re-tweet.

Does the reader have any responsibility or special ethical considerations for the re-use of your tweet? Should a journalist say ask you permission before quoting? I would say if you have publicly tweeted then no.  They have no ethical considerations beyond the usual they should have when preparing a story.

But what about copyright? Fair use? Is a tweet a work, or a part of a work? Especially if it is published! This is a bit of a grey area for me.  It seems to me there is an implicit release of copyright in the act of tweeting. Especially in a public feed.

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3 comments on “The Public Art of Publishing A Conversation

  1. debyfredericks
    June 12, 2014

    I think you are correct, anything you Tweet could be considered “published.” But by the same token, Tweeted material should be given the same consideration that any published material would. Ie: if people quote you, they should name the source and/or link back to your Twitter account. (This is the Internet, after all, and a link back is even better than a “like.”)

    The unfortunate reality is that a lot of people consider everything on the Internet up for grabs and most likely will not acknowledge or attribute the source. So if maintaining authorship is your goal, Twitter is probably not the best way to go. Nor Facebook. A blog might be better, as people seem to understand the blog post as more similar to an article and being the work of an individual.

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    • Michael J. Parry
      June 12, 2014

      Yes basic referencing should apply. Although even with blogs many people are lax in their attribution. In those cases journalist are often very dodgy in their reuse. How many times do you see an anonymous blogger without any referral to the actual blog?

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      • debyfredericks
        June 13, 2014

        Well, yes. I think there were always journalists who resisted ethical standards, and unfortunately in the Internet era they have no difficulty finding a platform.

        Like

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This entry was posted on June 11, 2014 by in Writing and tagged , , .

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